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Veterinary surgeons perform first-known brain surgery on seal

A neurosurgical team at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University has successfully performed what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind brain surgery on a Northern fur seal named Ziggy Star in an attempt to address her worsening neurologic condition. Ziggy, an adult female, is recovering well at her permanent home at Mystic Aquarium in Mystic, Connecticut. “The ability ...

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NOAA Satellite keeps an eye on US holiday travel weather

A satellite view of the U.S. on Dec. 22 revealed holiday travelers on both coasts are running into wet weather. A visible image from NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite showed systems affecting the Pacific Northwest, the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys and the areas from the southeastern U.S. to the Mid-Atlantic. NOAA’s GOES-East satellite provides infrared and visible data of the eastern half ...

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2017 top science news release breaks record

The most popular news release on EurekAlert! in 2017 is also the most-visited in the science-news service’s 21-year history. Attracting 898,848 views since April, the University of Central Florida release — describing an artificial photosynthesis process that cleans air while producing energy, complete with video — outperformed a 2012 announcement of trending releases from that year, which has clocked 886,820 visits in five years. Sunshine ...

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NASA captures image of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak moving over Philippines

NASA’s Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak that revealed the western side of storm had moved into the southern and central Philippines. Infrared data revealed very cold cloud top temperatures with the potential for heavy rainfall. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Kai-Tak on Dec. 14 at 12:11 ...

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UTA discovery to make high-speed Internet cheaper

New research has proved how to dramatically reduce the cost and energy consumption of high-speed internet connections, making high-speed Internet much cheaper than now. Researchers from the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Vermont have shown in their experiment that nonlinear-optical effects, such as intensity-dependent refractive index, can be used to process data thousands of times faster ...

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India, Japan to Send Joint Moon Mission Soon, Pact in 2 Months

TeamIndus rover

India and Japan will visit Japan jointly to bring back samples as part of their joint exploration mission. The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) have already been working on it. This is the third moon trip for both the nations. ISRO Chairman and Secretary, Department of Space, A.S.Kiran Kumar, and JAXA president Naoki ...

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Human evolution was uneven, punctuated, due to Neanderthals?

Neanderthals survived at least 3,000 years longer than we thought in Southern Iberia – what is now Spain – long after they had died out everywhere else, according to new research published in Heliyon. The authors of the study, an international team from Portuguese, Spanish, Catalonian, German, Austrian and Italian research institutions, say their findings suggest that the process of modern ...

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Unusual bone chips in Feet of Clog-Wearing 19th-Century Dutch Farmers Found

Bio-archeologists have discovered a pattern of unusual bone chips in the feet of clog-wearing 19th-Century Dutch farmers — injuries that offer clues to the damage we may unwittingly be causing to our own feet. The unexpected prevalence of damage in the farmers’ foot bones is more than just an historical curiosity; researchers believe their findings provide new insights into how ...

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Madrid was Arid Savanna During Middle Miocene Period: Study

IMAGE: THIS IS AN IMAGE OF AN ARID SAVANNA DURING THE MIDDLE MIOCENE IN MADRID. CREDIT: MARCO ANSÓN The Central Iberian Peninsula was characterised by a very arid savanna during the middle Miocene, according to a study led by the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) that compares the mammal assemblages from different localities in Africa and South Asia with those that ...

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Artificial intelligence: Is this the future of early cancer detection?

A new endoscopic system powered by artificial intelligence (AI) has today been shown to automatically identify colorectal adenomas during colonoscopy. The system, developed in Japan, has recently been tested in one of the first prospective trials of AI-assisted endoscopy in a clinical setting, with the results presented today at the 25th UEG Week in Barcelona, Spain. AI-assisted endocytoscopy – how ...

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Teamwork makes the dream work?

Numbered jerseys effectively increase overall teamwork performance during cardiac arrest. In new research from CHEST 2017, a team from Montefiore Medical Center in New York aimed to create a team-driven atmosphere in the hospital and hypothesized that the use of personalized numbered jerseys for each member of the code team would help to improve teamwork and overall time to perform ...

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Rapid cellphone charging getting closer to reality

The ability to charge cellphones in seconds is one step closer after researchers at the University of Waterloo used nanotechnology to significantly improve energy-storage devices known as supercapacitors. Their novel design roughly doubles the amount of electrical energy the rapid-charging devices can hold, helping pave the way for eventual use in everything from smartphones and laptop computers, to electric vehicles ...

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First white-box testing model finds thousands of errors in self-driving cars

Researchers from Lehigh University and Columbia University have created DeepXplore, the first efficient testing approach for deep learning platforms used in self-driving cars, malware-detection and other systems. How do you find errors in a system that exists in a black box? That is one of the challenges behind perfecting deep learning systems like self-driving cars. Deep learning systems are based ...

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India’s Space Mission to Moon ‘Chandrayaan- II’ to be Launched in 2018

India’s Space Mission to Moon, “Chandrayaan-II”, will take place in 2018, most likely in the first quarter of the year, said the Union Minister of State Atomic Energy and Space, Dr Jitendra Singh. Addressing the inaugural session of the 5-day Asian Conference on Remote Sensing here today, Dr Jitendra Singh said that India has today emerged as the world’s frontline ...

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Curve-eye-ture: How to grow artificial corneas

Scientists at Newcastle University, UK, and the University of California have developed a new method to grow curved human corneas improving the quality and transparency – solely by controlling the behaviour of cells in a dish. The research publishing today in Advanced Biosystems has revealed that corneal cells isolated from human donors and grown on curved surfaces arrange themselves in ...

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NJIT’s Kamalesh Sirkar wins coveted Award for Membrane Science and Technology Innovation

Kamalesh Sirkar, a chemical engineer acclaimed for his innovations in industrial membrane technology used to separate and purify air, water and waste streams and to improve the quality of manufactured products such as pharmaceuticals, solvents and nanoparticles, won the 2017 Alan S. Michaels Award for Innovation in Membrane Science and Technology. The award, given every three years by the North ...

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‘Seeing’ the other side of our galaxy

Astronomers have successfully traced a spiral arm on the far side of our Galaxy, an accomplishment that provides new insights into the structure of the Milky Way. Efforts to observe the far side of our Galaxy have been hampered by the vast distance and interstellar dust that blocks optical light from those regions. Here, Alberto Sanna and colleagues used radio ...

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Reducing racial bias in children

We tend to see people we’re biased against as all the same. They are “those people.” Instead of thinking of them as specific individuals, we lump them into a group. Now an international team of researchers suggests that one way to reduce racial bias in young children is by teaching them to distinguish among faces of a different race. The ...

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Burma’s Star Tortoise Makes a Comeback

The Burmese star tortoise (Geochelone platynota), a medium-sized tortoise found only in Myanmar’s central dry zone, has been brought back from the brink of extinction

The Burmese star tortoise (Geochelone platynota), a medium-sized tortoise found only in Myanmar’s central dry zone, has been brought back from the brink of extinction thanks to an aggressive captive-breeding effort spearheaded by a team of conservationists and government partners. Efforts to restore the tortoise are described in the latest issue of the peer-reviewed journal Herpetological Review. The tortoises now ...

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Nobel Prize for Physics, 2017 – Indian Connection

The 2017 Nobel Prize for Physics has been conferred to three scientists namely Rainer Weiss, Barry C Barish & Kip S Thorne under the LIGO Project for their discovery of gravitational waves, 100 years after Einstein’s General Relativity predicted it. The Nobel Prize for Physics 2017 celebrates the direct detection of Gravitational waves arriving from the merger two large Black ...

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Spacex Founder Elon Musk’s BFR Mega Plan Not Practical in 50 Years

Speaking at the International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide, Australia, SpaceX founder Elon Musk revealed the hysteric side of his vision to transport passengers from New York to Shanghai in 39 minutes and sending humans to Mars in 2022 and not beyond as estimated. “Most of what people consider to be long-distance trips could be completed in less than half-an-hour,” Musk ...

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Goodbye, login. Hello, heart scan

Forget fingerprint computer identification or retinal scanning. A University at Buffalo-led team has developed a computer security system using the dimensions of your heart as your identifier. The system uses low-level Doppler radar to measure your heart, and then continually monitors your heart to make sure no one else has stepped in to run your computer. The technology is described ...

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Dino-killing asteroid’s impact on bird evolution

Human activities could change the pace of evolution, similar to what occurred 66 million years ago when a giant asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs, leaving modern birds as their only descendants. That’s one conclusion drawn by the authors of a new study published in Systematic Biology. Cornell University Ph.D. candidate Jacob Berv and University of Bath Prize Fellow Daniel Field ...

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Smartphone apps reduce depression

New Australian-led research has confirmed that smartphone apps are an effective treatment option for depression, paving the way for safe and accessible interventions for the millions of people around the world diagnosed with this condition. Depression is the most prevalent mental disorder and a leading cause of global disability, with mental health services worldwide struggling to meet the demand for ...

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Ancient Viking World Had Women Army, Reveals Study

War was not an activity exclusive to males in the Viking world, revealed a new study conducted by researchers at Stockholm and Uppsala Universities. Women could be found in the higher ranks at the battlefield, it said. The study was conducted on the graves from the Viking Age that holds the remains of a warrior surrounded by weapons, including a ...

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ISRO to launch new satellite IRNSS-1H on August 31

Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) will launch its next satellite on August 31. ISRO said it would put into orbit the IRNSS-1H satellite at 18:59 hours on Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, using the rocket PSLV-C39 from Sriharikota. The payload would augment the capacity of India’s seven-satellite ‘NavIC’ constellation or the GPS equivalent in space. The NavIC constellation consists of 3 ...

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A more complete picture of the nano world

They may be tiny and invisible, says Xiaoji Xu, but the aerosol particles suspended in gases play a role in cloud formation and environmental pollution and can be detrimental to human health. Aerosol particles, which are found in haze, dust and vehicle exhaust, measure in the microns. One micron is one-millionth of a meter; a thin human hair is about ...

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Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer’s years before patients show symptoms

Cedars-Sinai neuroscience investigators have found that Alzheimer’s disease affects the retina — the back of the eye — similarly to the way it affects the brain. The study also revealed that an investigational, noninvasive eye scan could detect the key signs of Alzheimer’s disease years before patients experience symptoms. Using a high-definition eye scan developed especially for the study, researchers ...

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AI implications: Engineer’s model lays groundwork for machine-learning device

In what could be a small step for science potentially leading to a breakthrough, an engineer at Washington University in St. Louis has taken steps toward using nanocrystal networks for artificial intelligence applications. Elijah Thimsen, assistant professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and his collaborators have developed a model in which ...

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How future volcanic eruptions will impact Earth’s ozone layer

The next major volcanic eruption could kick-start chemical reactions that would seriously damage the planet’s already besieged ozone layer. The extent of damage to the ozone layer that results from a large, explosive eruption depends on complex atmospheric chemistry, including the levels of human-made emissions in the atmosphere. Using sophisticated chemical modeling, researchers from Harvard University and the University of ...

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