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Ancient Viking World Had Women Army, Reveals Study

War was not an activity exclusive to males in the Viking world, revealed a new study conducted by researchers at Stockholm and Uppsala Universities. Women could be found in the higher ranks at the battlefield, it said. The study was conducted on the graves from the Viking Age that holds the remains of a warrior surrounded by weapons, including a ...

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ISRO to launch new satellite IRNSS-1H on August 31

Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) will launch its next satellite on August 31. ISRO said it would put into orbit the IRNSS-1H satellite at 18:59 hours on Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, using the rocket PSLV-C39 from Sriharikota. The payload would augment the capacity of India’s seven-satellite ‘NavIC’ constellation or the GPS equivalent in space. The NavIC constellation consists of 3 ...

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A more complete picture of the nano world

They may be tiny and invisible, says Xiaoji Xu, but the aerosol particles suspended in gases play a role in cloud formation and environmental pollution and can be detrimental to human health. Aerosol particles, which are found in haze, dust and vehicle exhaust, measure in the microns. One micron is one-millionth of a meter; a thin human hair is about ...

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Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer’s years before patients show symptoms

Cedars-Sinai neuroscience investigators have found that Alzheimer’s disease affects the retina — the back of the eye — similarly to the way it affects the brain. The study also revealed that an investigational, noninvasive eye scan could detect the key signs of Alzheimer’s disease years before patients experience symptoms. Using a high-definition eye scan developed especially for the study, researchers ...

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AI implications: Engineer’s model lays groundwork for machine-learning device

In what could be a small step for science potentially leading to a breakthrough, an engineer at Washington University in St. Louis has taken steps toward using nanocrystal networks for artificial intelligence applications. Elijah Thimsen, assistant professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and his collaborators have developed a model in which ...

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How future volcanic eruptions will impact Earth’s ozone layer

The next major volcanic eruption could kick-start chemical reactions that would seriously damage the planet’s already besieged ozone layer. The extent of damage to the ozone layer that results from a large, explosive eruption depends on complex atmospheric chemistry, including the levels of human-made emissions in the atmosphere. Using sophisticated chemical modeling, researchers from Harvard University and the University of ...

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Defeating cyberattacks on 3-D printers

With cyberattacks on 3D printers likely to threaten health and safety, researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Georgia Institute of Technology have developed novel methods to combat them, according to a groundbreaking study. “They will be attractive targets because 3D-printed objects and parts are used in critical infrastructures around the world, and cyberattacks may cause failures in health care, transportation, ...

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Supervolcanoes: A key to America’s electric future?

Most of the lithium used to make the lithium-ion batteries that power modern electronics comes from Australia and Chile. But Stanford scientists say there are large deposits in sources right here in America: supervolcanoes. In a study published today in Nature Communications, scientists detail a new method for locating lithium in supervolcanic lake deposits. The findings represent an important step ...

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Oldest 8500-year-old Copper Smelting Unit Unearthed in Turkey

A team of archaeological scientists have found the earliest copper smelting event at the Late Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey, confirming the claim of the site’s archaeological importance. Whether metallurgy was such an exceptional skill to have only been invented once or repeatedly at different locations is therefore still contentious. The proponents of the latter have just provided ...

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Are your messages secure?

Researchers at Brigham Young University have learned that most users of popular messaging apps Facebook Messenger, What’sApp and Viber are leaving themselves exposed to fraud or other hacking because they don’t know about or aren’t using important security options. “We wanted to understand how typical users are protecting their privacy,” said BYU computer science Ph.D. student Elham Vaziripour, who led ...

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Attitudes on human genome editing vary, but reach consensus on holding talks

An international team of scientists announced they had successfully edited the DNA of human embryos. As people process the political, moral and regulatory issues of the technology — which nudges us closer to nonfiction than science fiction — researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Temple University show the time is now to involve the American public in discussions about ...

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Scientists discover unknown virus in ‘throwaway’ DNA

A chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses. In research published in the journal Virus Evolution, scientists from Oxford University’s Department of Zoology have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to ...

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Hiroshima Day 2017: How World Leaders Reacted Then?

Caption:- E.A. Miny./October, 1957, A22a(i)The Prime Minister, Shri Jawaharlal Nehru, addressing a mammoth gathering at the Peace Memorial Park at Hiroshima

Residents in Hiroshima observed a minute of silence marking the 72nd anniversary of the first atom bomb usage on August 6, 1945 by the US to end World War Two, bringing peace to the world but the death toll has climbed up to 164,621 so far. The event at Hiroshima’s memorial park was witnessed by people who released thousands of ...

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NASA-ISRO Joint Project NISAR to be Ready by 2021: Minister

ISRO

ISRO and NASA are working towards realisation of NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) mission by 2021, said MoS for Space, Dr Jitendra Singh in a written reply to a question in Rajya Sabha on Thursday, August 3, 2017. In NISAR mission, NASA is responsible for development of L-band SAR and ISRO is responsible for development of S-band SAR. The L&S ...

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Sleep or sex? How the fruit fly decides

Choosing between sex or sleep presents a behavioral quandary for many species, including the fruit fly. A multi-institution team has found that, in Drosophila at least, males and females deal with these competing imperatives in fundamentally different ways, they report July 28 in the journal Nature Communications. “An organism can only do one thing at a time,” said corresponding author ...

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Innovation Level

The Department of Science & Technology has launched a new programme ‘National Initiative for Developing & Harnessing Innovations (NIDHI)’ last year which covers the entire value chain of innovations starting from idea to commercialization. To promote innovation focused start-ups some of the key initiatives taken by the government are: 1. National Institution for Transforming India (NITI) Aayog is implementing Atal ...

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Benefits of Research

Government has taken numerous steps to ensure that the benefits of research by various scientific institutions and universities in the country reach to common man and also for commercialization of developed technology: • The Department of Science & Technology (DST) has launched many programs for well-being of the common man across the country, particularly those living in rural areas and ...

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PM expresses grief on demise of Professor Yash Pal

The Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi has expressed grief on the demise of Indian scientist and educationist Professor Yash Pal. ” Pained by Professor Yash Pal’s demise. We have lost a brilliant scientist & academician who made a lasting contribution to Indian education. Interacted with Professor Yash Pal extensively on many occasions including the National Children’s Science Congress in Gujarat ...

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Dragonfly brains predict the path of their prey

New research from Australia and Sweden has shown how a dragonfly’s brain anticipates the movement of its prey, enabling it to hunt successfully. This knowledge could lead to innovations in fields such as robot vision. An article published today in the journal eLife by researchers at the University of Adelaide and Lund University has offered more insights into the complexity ...

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Magnetic quantum objects in a ‘nano egg-box’

Magnetic quantum objects in superconductors, so-called “fluxons”, are particularly suitable for the storage and processing of data bits. Computer circuits based on fluxons could be operated with significantly higher speed and, at the same time, produce much less heat dissipation. Physicists around Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna and their colleagues at the Johannes-Kepler-University Linz have now succeeded in ...

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42 Indian Satellites Orbiting in Outer Space: Minister

ISRO

At present, there are 42 Indian satellites operational in orbit, 15 of them for communication, 4 for meteorological observations, 14 for earth observations, 7 for navigation and 2 for space science purposes. During FY 2016-17, the total revenue accrued from communication satellites through leasing of INSAT/ GSAT transponders is Rs. 746.68 crore. With respect to earth observation satellites, the annual ...

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Team develops fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes

UW team develops fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes for electric cars, high-powered lasers. Supercapacitors are an aptly named type of device that can store and deliver energy faster than conventional batteries. They are in high demand for applications including electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers. But to realize these applications, supercapacitors need better electrodes, which connect the ...

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The glass transition caught in the act

We learn in school that matter comes in three states: solid, liquid and gas. A bored and clever student (we’ve all met one) then sometimes asks whether glass is a solid or a liquid. The student has a point. Glasses are weird “solid liquids” that are cooled so fast their atoms or molecules jammed before organizing themselves in the regular ...

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Empowering robots for ethical behavior

Scientists at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK have developed a concept called Empowerment to help robots to protect and serve humans, while keeping themselves safe. Robots are becoming more common in our homes and workplaces and this looks set to continue. Many robots will have to interact with humans in unpredictable situations. For example, self-driving cars need to ...

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3-D models help scientists gauge flood impact

Heavy rainfall can cause rivers and drainage systems to overflow or dams to break, leading to flood events that bring damage to property and road systems as well potential loss of human life. One such event in 2008 cost $10 billion in damages for the entire state of Iowa. After the flood, the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) at the University ...

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Iran-Origin Maths Wizard Maryam Dies at 40

Iranian-origin Harvard-studied maths wizard Maryam Mirzakhani died aged 40 after a long battle with breast cancer that had spread to her bones. She was the first recipient of the prestigious Fields Medal at a very young age. Mirzakhani won the Fields Medal in 2014 for her work on geometry and dynamical systems and was the first Iranian to win the ...

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Fossil Site Shows Impact of Early Jurassic Period’s Low Oxygen Oceans

Using a combination of fossils and chemical markers, scientists have tracked low ocean-oxygen in early Jurassic marine ecosystem that could have led to survival of only a few species. The research, led by Rowan Martindale of the University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences, zeroes in on a recently discovered fossil site in Canada located at Ya Ha Tinda ...

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Hubble Spots Barred Spiral Galaxy Lynx

Discovered by British astronomer William Herschel over 200 years ago, NGC 2500 lies about 30 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Lynx. The NGC 2500 is a particular kind of spiral galaxy known as a barred spiral, its wispy arms swirling out from a bright, elongated core. Barred spirals are actually more common than was once thought. Around two-thirds ...

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Using Einstein’s Theory, Brightest Galaxy 10000 Million Light Years Away Discovered

Using Albert Einstein’s gravitational lensing theory, scientists have discovered a galaxy at about 10,000 million light years away but thousand times brighter than the nearest Milky Way. Anastasio Diaz-Sanches from Polytechnic University of Cartagena (UPCT) in Spain used gravitational lensing phenomenon found by Einstein to magnify the apparent image of the original object. “Thanks to the gravitational lens” explained Sánchez, ...

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Diet rich in tomatoes cuts skin cancer in half in mice

Daily tomato consumption appeared to cut the development of skin cancer tumors by half in a mouse study at The Ohio State University. The new study of how nutritional interventions can alter the risk for skin cancers appeared online in the journal Scientific Reports. It found that male mice fed a diet of 10 percent tomato powder daily for 35 ...

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