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Mass media linked to childhood obesity

A task force from the European Academy of Paediatrics and the European Childhood Obesity Group has found evidence of a strong link between obesity levels across European countries and childhood media exposure. The experts’ review is published in Acta Paediatrica. The findings indicate that parents and society need a better understanding of the influence of social media on dietary habits. ...

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Leaving the house every day may help older adults live longer

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of community-dwelling individuals aged 70 to 90 years who were participating in the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study, leaving the house daily was linked with a lower risk of dying over an extended follow-up period, independent of social, functional, or medical factors. The study’s investigators noted that getting outside of one’s home provides ...

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Not English but mother tongue helps marriages to last longer: Study

Amid rising number of intercultural marriages, more and more couples use English as the lingua franca but speaking in common native language helped many marriages to last longer, said a new study. Kaisa Pietikainen from the University of Helsinki, who has studied the interactions of these so-called ELF couples in her doctoral dissertation, says:”It’s often thought that when the partners ...

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Learning and staying in shape key to longer lifespan, study finds

People who are overweight cut their life expectancy by two months for every extra kilogramme of weight they carry, research suggests. A major study of the genes that underpin longevity has also found that education leads to a longer life, with almost a year added for each year spent studying beyond school. Other key findings are that people who give ...

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Reducing racial bias in children

We tend to see people we’re biased against as all the same. They are “those people.” Instead of thinking of them as specific individuals, we lump them into a group. Now an international team of researchers suggests that one way to reduce racial bias in young children is by teaching them to distinguish among faces of a different race. The ...

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The female brain reacts more strongly to prosocial behavior than the male brain

Behavioral experiments have shown that when women share a sum of money more generously than men. To gain a more in-depth understanding of this behavior, neuroscientists from the Department of Economics looked at the areas of the brain that are active when decisions of this kind are made. They are the first to demonstrate that the brains of men and ...

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Pushy or laid back? Economic factors influence parenting style

Settling on a parenting style is challenging. Is it better to be strict or more lenient? Have helicopter parents found the right approach to guiding their children’s choices? A new study co-authored by Yale economist Fabrizio Zilibotti argues that parenting styles are shaped by economic factors that incentivize one strategy over others. Zilibotti and co-author Matthias Doepke, a professor of ...

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Women use gossip to compete for a man’s attention

Although both men and women gossip, women may be more likely to use gossiping and rumour-mongering as tactics to badmouth a potential rival who is competing for a man’s attention. Women also gossip more about other women’s looks, whereas men talk about cues to resource holding (e.g., wealth) and the athleticism of their competitors. According to Adam Davis of the ...

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Trends, benefits, and costs of working remotely

A new assessment indicates that working remotely is a growing trend, and while it is associated with higher organisational commitment, job satisfaction, and job-related well-being, these benefits come at the cost of work intensification and a greater inability to switch off. The findings are published in New Technology, Work and Employment. “Work is gradually being detached from traditional places such ...

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Black tea may help with weight loss, too

UCLA researchers have demonstrated for the first time that black tea may promote weight loss and other health benefits by changing bacteria in the gut. In a study of mice, the scientists showed that black tea alters energy metabolism in the liver by changing gut metabolites. The research is published in the European Journal of Nutrition. The study found that ...

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One hour of exercise a week can prevent depression

A landmark study led by the Black Dog Institute has revealed that regular exercise of any intensity can prevent future depression – and just one hour can help. Published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry, the results show even small amounts of exercise can protect against depression, with mental health benefits seen regardless of age or gender. In the ...

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Group project? Taking turns, working with friends may improve grades

It has become an almost essential element of academic life, from college lecture halls to elementary classrooms: the group assignment. Dreaded by some, loved by others, group projects typically aim to build teamwork and accountability while students learn about a topic. But depending on the assignment and the structure of the groups, a project can turn out to be a ...

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Weight loss for adults at any age leads to cost savings, study suggests

Helping an adult lose weight leads to significant cost savings at any age, with those savings peaking at age 50, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study. The findings, which will be published online September 26 in the journal Obesity, suggests that a 20-year-old adult who goes from being obese to overweight would save an average ...

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For a better ‘I,’ there needs to be a supportive ‘we’

If you’re one of those lucky individuals with high motivation and who actively pursues personal growth goals, thank your family and friends who support you. People who view their relationships as supportive may confidently strive for growth, new University of Michigan research shows. U-M researchers used data from samples from the United States and Japan to determine if personal growth ...

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Fifty-fifty split best for children of divorce

Preschool children in joint physical custody have less psychological symptoms than those who live mostly or only with one parent after a separation. In a new study of 3,656 children in Sweden, researchers from Uppsala University, Karolinska Institutet and the research institute CHESS show that 3-5-year-olds living alternately with their parents after a separation show less behavioural problems and psychological ...

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Patient plays saxophone while surgeons remove brain tumor

Music is not only a major part of Dan Fabbio’s life, as a music teacher it is his livelihood. So when doctors discovered a tumor located in the part of his brain responsible for music function, he began a long journey that involved a team of physicians, scientists, and a music professor and culminated with him awake and playing a ...

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Eating protein three times a day could make our seniors stronger

Loss of muscle is an inevitable consequence of aging that can lead to frailty, falls or mobility problems. Eating enough protein is one way to remedy it, but it would seem that spreading protein equally among the three daily meals could be linked to greater mass and muscle strength in the elderly. These are the findings of a study conducted ...

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Social media culture can encourage risky and inappropriate posting behavior

The use of social media is pervasive among young adults, but not all posted content is appropriate. Now a new study by the University of Plymouth investigates why young adults might post content on social media that contains sexual or offensive material. Led by Dr Claire White from the University’s School of Psychology, the study suggests that such risky social ...

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Religious affiliation impacts language use on Facebook

Are you more likely to use words like “happy” and “family” in your social media posts? Or do you use emotional and cognitive words like “angry” and “thinking?” The words you use may be a clue to your religious affiliation. A study of 12,815 U.S. and U.K. Facebook users finds use of positive emotion and social words is associated with ...

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Should I stay or should I leave?

Knowing whether to stay in or leave a romantic relationship is often an agonizing experience and that ambivalence can have negative consequences for health and well-being. Now a new study offers insights into what people are deliberating about and what makes the decision so difficult, which could help therapists working with couples and stimulate further research into the decision-making process. ...

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Older users like to snoop on Facebook, but worried others might snoop on them

Older adults are drawn to Facebook so they can check out pictures and updates from family and friends, but may resist using the site because they are worried about who will see their own content, according to a team of researchers. In a study of older people’s perception of Facebook, participants listed keeping in touch, monitoring other’s updates and sharing ...

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The environmental injustice of beauty

Women of color have higher levels of beauty-product-related chemicals in their bodies compared to white women, according to a commentary published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The authors say even small exposures to such toxic chemicals can lead to health problems. They go on to say that reproductive health professionals must be prepared to counsel patients ...

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Depression overshadows the past as well as the present

Depressed people have a peculiar view of the past – rather than glorifying the ‘good old days’, they project their generally bleak outlook on to past events, according to new research. It is known depression makes sufferers see the present and the future as sad, but this is the first time research has shown it also casts a long shadow ...

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American workplace is physically and emotionally taxing: survey

The American workplace is physically and emotionally taxing, with workers frequently facing unstable work schedules, unpleasant and potentially hazardous working conditions, and an often hostile social environment, according to a new study that probes working conditions in the United States. The findings stem from research conducted by investigators at the nonprofit, nonpartisan RAND Corporation, Harvard Medical School and UCLA, and ...

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Smartphone tracking shows fear affects where youth spend time

Youth spend less time in their neighborhoods if area residents have a high fear of crime, according to a new study that used smartphones to track kids’ whereabouts. Researchers found that adolescents aged 11 to 17 spent over an hour less each day on average in their neighborhoods if residents there were very fearful, compared to kids from areas perceived ...

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Are your messages secure?

Researchers at Brigham Young University have learned that most users of popular messaging apps Facebook Messenger, What’sApp and Viber are leaving themselves exposed to fraud or other hacking because they don’t know about or aren’t using important security options. “We wanted to understand how typical users are protecting their privacy,” said BYU computer science Ph.D. student Elham Vaziripour, who led ...

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Eating disorders linked to increased risk of theft and other criminal behavior

In an analysis of nearly 960,000 females, individuals with eating disorders were more likely to be convicted of theft and other crimes. The incidences of theft and other convictions were 12% and 7%, respectively, in those with anorexia nervosa, 18% and 13% in those with bulimia nervosa, and 5% and 6% in those without eating disorders. The associations with theft ...

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Managers can help prevent employees from working while sick

A new study indicates that managerial support can help prevent employees who work extremely hard out of an obsessive drive (‘workaholics’) from forcing themselves to attend work when feeling sick. Such support from managers can also help address work-family conflict in workaholics. Increasing the awareness of supervisors of the harmful consequences and costs associated with showing up to work while ...

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So lonely I could die

Social isolation, loneliness could be greater threat to public health than obesity, researchers say. Loneliness and social isolation may represent a greater public health hazard than obesity, and their impact has been growing and will continue to grow, according to research presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association. “Being connected to others socially is widely considered ...

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Study explains link between academic performance and violence

Numerous studies have shown a relationship between high-crime communities and the academic performance of children who live within them. Now, new Northwestern University research suggests sleep disruption following violent incidents and increased amounts of the stress hormone cortisol offer a biological explanation for why children who live in neighborhoods with higher rates of violent crime struggle more in school. “Both ...

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