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Sclerosis Medicine can help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria

A surprising discovery shows that a widely used and 20-year-old medicine used to treat multiple sclerosis can also beat a type of multi-resistant bacteria for which there are currently only a few effective drugs. Encountering bacteria with innocent names such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae can lead to hospitalisation and – in a worst-case scenario – can also be life-threatening. The bacteria, ...

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Forgetting Face Recognition? Check for Dementia, say Japanese Researchers

A Japanese research group has proposed that failure to recognize or memorize human faces in the short term could be early stage of dementia. The elderly with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) suffer from weakened ability to recognize faces when compared to healthy elderly people. When trying to memorize, their gaze is also different, suggest Japanese researchers. Alzheimer’s disease, the most ...

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Ileana Once Thought of Committing Suicide!

Hindi and Telugu actress Ileana D’Cruz revealed that she once thought of committing suicide due to depression and Body Dysmorphic Disorder. However, she had overcome the illness and started feeling better. Speaking at the 21st World Congress of Mental Health in New Delhi on Sunday, November 5, Ileana told Organising Chairman Sunil Mittal on her fight with depression and Body ...

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Expert wary over collecting trend of apps, sharing health data

As of 2016 there were more than 165,000 health and wellness apps available though the Apple App Store alone. According to Rice University medical media expert Kirsten Ostherr, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates only a fraction of those. Americans should be concerned about how these apps collect, save and share their personal health data, she said. On Oct. ...

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Ketamine may help treat migraine compared to other therapies

Ketamine, a medication commonly used for pain relief and increasingly used for depression, may help alleviate migraine pain in patients who have not been helped by other treatments, said a new study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2017 annual meeting. The study of 61 patients found that almost 75 percent experienced an improvement in their migraine intensity after a three- to ...

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‘Increased risk’ donor organs a tough sell to transplant patients

Increasingly, transplant surgeons must initiate a tough conversation: explaining to patients what it means to accept an organ from a person who died from a drug overdose. Organ donors who recently injected drugs, as well those who were incarcerated or had sex for drugs or money, are among a growing group of people classified as being at “increased risk” of ...

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Black tea may help with weight loss, too

UCLA researchers have demonstrated for the first time that black tea may promote weight loss and other health benefits by changing bacteria in the gut. In a study of mice, the scientists showed that black tea alters energy metabolism in the liver by changing gut metabolites. The research is published in the European Journal of Nutrition. The study found that ...

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1 in 3 older adults take something to help them sleep but many don’t talk to their doctors

1 in 12 people over age 65 take prescription sleep medications, which carry health risks for older people, U-M/AARP National Poll on Healthy Aging finds. Sleep doesn’t come easily for nearly half of older Americans, and more than a third have resorted to some sort of medication to help them doze off at night, according to new results from the ...

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Government enhances superannuation age of doctors to 65 years

A visionary and pragmatic decision that will strengthen the health services in the country: J P Nadda The Union Cabinet chaired by the Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi has approved the enhancement of superannuation age of doctors other than doctors of the Central Health Services (CHS) falling under various Departments/Ministries/autonomous organisations, to 65 years. Union Minister of Health and Family ...

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Antibody protects against Zika and dengue, mouse study shows

Brazil and other areas hardest hit by the Zika virus – which can cause babies to be born with abnormally small heads – are also home to dengue virus, which is spread by the same mosquito species. A new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that an antibody that protects against dengue ...

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Child abuse affects brain wiring

Impaired neural connections may explain profound and long-lasting effects of traumatic experiences during childhood For the first time, researchers have been able to see changes in the neural structures in specific areas of the brains of people who suffered severe abuse as children. Difficulties associated with severe childhood abuse include increased risks of psychiatric disorders such as depression, as well ...

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New hope for ‘bubble baby disease’

Babies born with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) syndrome are defenceless against bacterial and viral infections that would be virtually harmless to most healthy people. If untreated, SCID is often fatal within a baby’s first year of life. Research led by the University of Hong Kong has resulted in a new testing regime that could speed up the diagnosis of ...

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9/11 ‘dust’ Leaves Many Children with Risk of Heart Disease

After the collapse of the World Trade Center towers on 9/11 in 2001, the “cloud” of toxic debris across Lower Manhattan, left behind nearby children who breathed in the ash and fumes to suffer from heart disease 16 years after. An analysis by NYU Langone Health researchers of blood tests of 308 children, 123 of whom may have come in ...

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A ‘virtual heart’ to simulate arrhythmia

A group of researchers from MIPT and Ghent University (Belgium) has developed the first realistic model able to reproduce the complexity of the cardiac microstructure. The researchers hope that the model will help them better understand the causes of fibrosis which affects the onset of cardiac arrhythmias. Although the model is currently only able to simulate one layer of cardiac ...

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Yoga and meditation improve brain function and energy levels

Practicing brief sessions of Hatha yoga and mindfulness meditation can significantly improve brain function and energy levels, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. The study found that practicing just 25 minutes of Hatha yoga or mindfulness meditation per day can boost the brain’s executive functions, cognitive abilities linked to goal-directed behavior and the ability to control ...

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Swacch Vidyalaya Puraskar 2017

Students are cleanliness ambassadors: Prakash Javadekar In his Independence Day address to the nation on 15th August, 2014 Hon’ble Prime Minister called upon that all schools in the country should have toilets with separate toilets for girls. Only then our daughters will not be compelled to leave schools mid way… The Department has taken new initiative for furtherance of Swachh ...

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Patient plays saxophone while surgeons remove brain tumor

Music is not only a major part of Dan Fabbio’s life, as a music teacher it is his livelihood. So when doctors discovered a tumor located in the part of his brain responsible for music function, he began a long journey that involved a team of physicians, scientists, and a music professor and culminated with him awake and playing a ...

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Eating protein three times a day could make our seniors stronger

Loss of muscle is an inevitable consequence of aging that can lead to frailty, falls or mobility problems. Eating enough protein is one way to remedy it, but it would seem that spreading protein equally among the three daily meals could be linked to greater mass and muscle strength in the elderly. These are the findings of a study conducted ...

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High salt intake associated with doubled risk of heart failure

High salt intake is associated with a doubled risk of heart failure, according to a 12-year study in more than 4 000 people presented today at ESC Congress.1 “High salt (sodium chloride) intake is one of the major causes of high blood pressure and an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke,” said Prof Pekka Jousilahti, research ...

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Higher coffee consumption associated with lower risk of death

Higher coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of death, according to research presented today at ESC Congress.1 The observational study in nearly 20 000 participants suggests that coffee can be part of a healthy diet in healthy people. “Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages around the world,” said Dr Adela Navarro, a cardiologist at Hospital ...

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High Salt Intake Doubles Risk of Heart Failure: Study

High salt intake is associated with a doubled risk of heart failure, according to a 12-year study in more than 4,000 people. The study assessed the relationship of salt intake and the development of heart failure.  This study used 24 hour sodium extraction, which is considered the gold standard for salt intake estimation at individual level. “High salt (sodium chloride) ...

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Omega-3 intake reduces cardiac death risk : A comprehensive new study

Results from a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology showed that in 14 randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) of 71,899 people, consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3s reduced the risk of cardiac death by a statistically-significant average of 8 percent. Cardiac death accounts for about two-thirds (about 405,000) of all cardiovascular disease deaths in the United States, and ...

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Is childhood obesity a psychological disorder?

A team of researchers, including senior investigator, Bradley Peterson, MD, director of the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, used fMRI to investigate neural responses to food cues in overweight compared with lean adolescents. The team observed that food stimuli activated regions of the brain associated with reward and emotion in all groups. However, adolescents at ...

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A tougher tooth

Fewer trips to the dentist may be in your future, and you have mussels to thank. Inspired by the mechanisms mussels use to adhere to inhospitable surfaces, UC Santa Barbara researchers have developed a new type of dental composite that provides an extra layer of durability to treated teeth. The potential payoff? Longer lasting fillings, crowns, implants and other work. ...

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Using machine learning to improve patient care

Doctors are often deluged by signals from charts, test results, and other metrics to keep track of. It can be difficult to integrate and monitor all of these data for multiple patients while making real-time treatment decisions, especially when data is documented inconsistently across hospitals. In a new pair of papers, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory ...

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Sedentary behavior increases risk of death for frail, inactive adults

Sedentary time, for example, time spent sitting, increases the risk of death for middle-aged and older people who are frail and inactive, but does not appear to increase the risk for nonfrail people who are inactive, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Many studies have looked at the benefits of physical activity on health, ...

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Vitamin D deficiency linked to increased heart failure risk in older adults

A recent study found an elevated risk of heart failure in more than half of older individuals, and this risk was significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency. Specifically, vitamin D deficiency was linked with a 12.2-times increased risk of heart failure. The study, which involved an analysis of the medical records of 137 individuals in Brazil aged 60 years and ...

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Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer’s years before patients show symptoms

Cedars-Sinai neuroscience investigators have found that Alzheimer’s disease affects the retina — the back of the eye — similarly to the way it affects the brain. The study also revealed that an investigational, noninvasive eye scan could detect the key signs of Alzheimer’s disease years before patients experience symptoms. Using a high-definition eye scan developed especially for the study, researchers ...

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Environment Minister Launches “Harit Diwali, Swasth Diwali” Campaign

Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan, launched the “Harit Diwali, Swasth Diwali” campaign, here today. Addressing a gathering of about 800 children from schools of Delhi and NCR, the Minister impressed upon the children the importance of their contribution towards reducing pollution by not bursting harmful fire crackers during Diwali. Congratulating the teachers and students, ...

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Outdoor light at night linked with increased breast cancer risk in women

A large long-term study found that breast cancer risk may be higher for women who live in areas with high levels of outdoor light at night. The link between outdoor light at night and breast cancer was found only among women who were premenopausal and were current or past smokers, and was stronger among those who worked night shifts. Women ...

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